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Levi Hill
Levi Hill

Missing Audio-en.sb For NFS The Run PC [PATCHED]


Can somebody please advise me how to get through the endless dependency issues that come up when installing new apps on Linux ? I originally gave up on Linux some years back for exactly this reason - every time you try to install something there is a new dependency that is missing, and so you download the dependency, only to find that the dependency itself needs another dependency and so on ad nauseum. I thought I'd give it another bash with Ubuntu 7.10, tried to install Vodafone Mobile Data Card Software for Linux, which needed dependency python-twisted, which I downloaded, which needed python-zope interface, which I downloaded only to find it needs python 2.4 which it also complained about because my current version (2.5) is too new ! Moral of the story ... gave up again. (Note, I am trying to install my internet software, so for now I do not have internet access in Linux - on the off-chance that it is possible to download missing dependencies automatically. (Have to keep switching back to Windows to download the missing dependencies) --196.207.47.60 (talk) 09:53, 28 December 2007 (UTC)Reply[reply]




Missing Audio-en.sb For NFS The Run PC



  • First of all, I would suggest you to install a fresh copy ofWindows NT 4.0 on your hard disk. I suppose that you alreadymade a backup of your important data, so the NT installationshouldn't be a problem. During the NT installation, setup isnot going to ask you where to place NT's boot loader, so itwould be placed into the MBR (Master Boot Record) of your harddisk. But, there is a possibility for a previous content ofthe MBR to remain within the MBR (especially any previousLilo), so I would suggest you (before installation of NT) toboot the computer with a DOS floppy diskette having DOS versionof FDISK. At the prompt a:\ just enter the command: fdisk /mbr and restart the computer again (without that floppy).

  • After you have successfully installed your NT, you will see thatit uses the whole hard disk or a specific partition of the harddisk (depending on what you decided during the setup process).So, it is advisable to 'shrink' the partition where NT residesin order to make some free space on the disk. Onto that free spaceyou will install your Linux. After you have your NT configuredand running, you have to boot your computer using a floppydiskette with Partition Magic utility by Power Quest. It is agraphical tool able to see all partitions on all hard disks youhave. The best thing is that you can make some changes with yourpartitions but not to destroy your existing data. One of theavailable changes is to make your existing partition(s) smaller,so to get some free space on the disk(s) for other purposes.Although you are advised to make a backup before you make anychanges to the partitions, I usually practice to 'shrink' NT'spartition(s) before I install anything else onto this NT (so, ifneeded, a repetitive NT re-installation wouldn't be a problem).Well, Partition Magic (or any other similar utility you arefamiliar with) will shrink your NT's partition (either NTFS orFAT) to a smaller measure and place it to either the beginningor to the end of the previous measure. It means that you maychoose to have your 'shrinked' NT partition at the beginningor at the end of your disk (I usually choose NT to be at thebeginning, so the ending part of the disk will become a 'freespace'). After the 'shrinking' is finished, you may re-boot yourNT in order to check the new situation: you may use WindowsExplorer or Disk Administrator for that.

  • As it was said in Introduction, it might not be neededalways to use such tools like Partition Magic. It is better to say that this tool is of a great value in all those cases you have beenrunning Windows NT for a long time, so you don't want to startfrom 'scratch'. For example, you are fully satisfied with yourbeloved NT and related applications. You are not likely to killNT, but you have recognized that you have enough unused space on NT's partition(s) (i.e. NT's partition(s) might look not much populated). That case, Partition Magic is your choice.But, if you do start from the beginning, or you don't mindre-formatting the disk, it might be suitable to get a blankfloppy diskette, make it to be DOS bootable and copy two DOStools on it: FDISK and FORMAT. So, restart your computer withsuch floppy and at A:\ prompt enter fdisk.There you'll find several options that allow re-partition ofyour hard disk(s). Now you could make a part of the disk a FATpartition (where you'll later install your beloved NT). The restof space you'd better leave alone (i.e. do not attempt making Linux partition(s) right now, using DOS's version of FDISK). Ifyou really want to make Linux-type partitions now, youshould look after Linux version of FDISK.

  • So far so good. Next step is to install your Linux. Case you are familiar with RedHat distribution (I hope with other distrosis the same or similar), you start by putting your installationCD in the drive and re-boot the computer). Well, when you are aboutto choose what type of installation it will be (Gnome or KDE Workstation, Custom, etc.) you may choose whatever you plannedbefore, but I would suggest to install a Workstation at first.This is good because Linux setup will find automatically thefree space on the (first) hard disk, make all partitions neededfor Linux, format them properly, make majority of options bydefault so you won't have much pain during the setup (later, if you want, you may either add missing components or re-install RedHat Linux as Custom over the existing linux partitions). Lilo should go to the MBR.

  • Don't forget to make Linux boot floppy diskette. You'll neverknow when you may need it. If something goes wrong with the MBR, and you don't have boot floppy, your Linux might become not accessible,so you might have to re-install it again.

  • After it looks that Linux installation is finished, you are goingto re-start the computer and there you will only see Lilowith only one entry to boot: Linux (or maybe more than one Linuxentry, in case your hardware is multi-processor one or so). But, don'tpanic! Your Windows NT is still there - where you had installed itbefore Linux. You should become some familiar with Linux as soonas possible, in order to be able to find and edit your new/etc/lilo.conf file. When you open this file for the first time,you'll see that there is only one (or more) Linux entry. Well,you should know the exact position (read: a partition) whereWindows NT has been installed, so you could add an appropriateentry into /etc/lilo.conf file. After you make those changes, restart Lilo with a command: /sbin/lilo and, after the next re-boot, you will have both 'linux' and 'nt' (or 'dos' or similar)entries under Lilo menu.

My added NT entry is: other=/dev/hda1 label=nt


  • First of all, I would suggest you to install a fresh copy ofWindows NT 4.0 on your first hard disk. I suppose that you alreadymade a backup of your important data, so the NT installationshouldn't be a problem. You can easily copy your data on your second hard disk or so. During the NT installation, setup isnot going to ask you where to place NT's boot loader, so itwould be placed into the MBR (Master Boot Record) of your first harddisk. But, there is a possibility for a previous content ofthe MBR to remain within the MBR (especially any previousLilo), so I would suggest you (before installation of NT) toboot the computer with a DOS floppy diskette having DOS versionof FDISK. At the prompt a:\ just enter the command: fdisk /mbr and restart the computer again (without that floppy). If youwant to be sure about your machine is 'clean', you may alsodelete any existing partition(s) on your other disks, during theWindows NT Setup in case you have *not* made any backup onother disks.

  • After you have successfully installed your NT, you will see thatit uses the whole hard disk or a specific partition of the harddisk (depending on what you decided during the setup process).So, it is advisable to 'shrink' the partition where NT residesin order to make some free space on the disk. Onto that free spaceyou will install your Linux. Well, you may also think of usingother disk(s) you have for Linux (so did I). That case, youwould start your linux installation and tried to use, for example,/dev/sdb (or sdc, or sdd, or else in case of SCSI system) or/dev/hdb (or hdc, or hdd, or else in case of IDE system). Lookedthat Linux installation accepted whatever I chose, but somehowafter all was finished, when I did that, LILO was not able todo anything. Actually, it always stopped after 'LI' so it was notpossible to start Linux at all. Finally, after pulling my hairout, I decided to make it all on the first disk. So, afterI had NT configured and running, I had to boot my computer usinga floppy diskette with Partition Magic utility by Power Quest.It is a graphical tool able to see all partitions on all hard disks youhave. The best thing is that you can make some changes with yourpartitions but not to destroy your existing data. One of theavailable changes is to make your existing partition(s) smaller,so you can get some free space on the disk(s) for other purposes.Although you are advised to make a backup before you make anychanges with your partitions, I usually practice to 'shrink' NT'spartition before I install anything but NT itself (so, ifneeded, a repetitive re-installation wouldn't be a problem).Well, Partition Magic (or any other similar utility you arefamiliar with) will shrink your NT's partition (either NTFS orFAT) to a smaller measure and place it to either the beginningor to the end of the previous measure. It means that you maychoose to have your 'shrinked' NT partition at the beginningor at the end of your disk. I usually choose NT to be at thebeginning, so the ending part of the disk will become a 'freespace'. I discovered some problems if the 'free space' is madeat the beginning of disk (later we'll talk about). So, after the 'shrinking' is finished, you may re-boot yourNT in order to check the new situation: you may use WindowsExplorer or Disk Administrator for that. You will also note howNT can 'see' all (other) disks you have in your machine (eitherpartitioned or as 'free space' areas).

  • Once again, as it was said earlier, it might not be neededalways to use such tools like Partition Magic. It is better to say that this tool is of a great value in all those cases you have beenrunning Windows NT for a long time, so you don't want to startfrom 'scratch'. For example, you are fully satisfied with yourbeloved NT and related applications. You are not likely to killNT, but you have recognized that you have enough unused space on NT's partition(s) (i.e. NT's partition(s) might look not much populated). That case, Partition Magic is your choice.But, if you do start from the beginning, or you don't mindre-formatting the disk(s), it might be suitable to get a blankfloppy diskette, make it to be DOS bootable and copy two DOStools on it: FDISK and FORMAT. So, restart your computer withsuch floppy and at A:\ prompt enter fdisk.There you'll find several options that allow re-partition ofyour hard disk(s). Now you could make a part of the disk a FATpartition (where you'll later install your beloved NT). The restof space you'd better leave alone (i.e. do not attempt making Linux partition(s) right now, using DOS's version of FDISK). Ifyou really want to make Linux-type partitions now, youshould look after Linux version of FDISK.

  • So far so good. Next step is to install your Linux. Case you are familiar with RedHat distribution (I hope with other distrosis the same or similar), you start by putting your installationCD in the drive and re-boot the computer). Well, when you are aboutto choose what type of installation it will be (Gnome or KDE Workstation, Custom, etc.) you may choose whatever you plannedbefore, but I would suggest to install a Workstation at first.This is good because Linux setup will find automatically thefree space on the first hard disk, make all partitions neededfor Linux, format them properly, make majority of options bydefault so you won't have much pain during the setup (later, ifyou want, you may either add missing components or re-installLinux as Custom over the existing linux partitions). Lilo shouldgo to the MBR of your first disk.

  • After it looks that Linux installation is finished, you are goingto re-start the computer and there you will only see Lilowith one Linux entry to boot (or maybe more than one Linuxentry, in case your hardware is multi-processor one). But, don'tpanic! Your Windows NT is still there where you had installed itbefore Linux. You should become some familiar with Linux as soonas possible, in order to be able to find and edit your new/etc/lilo.conf file. When you open this file for the first time,you'll see that there is only one (or more) Linux entry. Well,you should know the exact position (read: a partition) whereWindows NT has been installed, so you could add an appropriateentry into /etc/lilo.conf file. After you do that, restart Liloand, after the next re-boot, you will have both 'linux' and 'nt'entries under Lilo menu.

My added NT entry is: other=/dev/sda1 label=nt


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