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3 From Hell(2019) BEST


3 from Hell is a 2019 American horror film written, co-produced, and directed by Rob Zombie. It is the third installment in the Firefly trilogy, which began with House of 1000 Corpses (2003), and stars Sheri Moon Zombie, Bill Moseley, Richard Brake and Sid Haig. Ten years have passed since the events of The Devil's Rejects (2005). The plot follows an incarcerated Otis Driftwood and Baby Firefly being freed by Otis's half-brother, after barely surviving a police shootout a decade ago.




3 from Hell(2019)


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The film opens with several news reports about the Firefly family's murderous rampage. Through the reports, it is revealed that Baby, Otis, and Captain Spaulding miraculously survived their shootout with the police and that they will be tried for their crimes. The trial is widely covered nationwide and becomes a cause célèbre, resulting in the organization of protests that insist the trio's innocence. Numerous fanatics also adopt the chant "Free the Three", claiming that their crimes were committed as a means to fight against the system. Despite this, all three are found guilty and sentenced to life in prison. In addition to the final verdict, Captain Spaulding is executed via lethal injection. Otis' half-brother, Winslow Foxworth "Foxy" Coltrane, shows up to help Otis escape from prison while he is outside doing work on a chain gang. In the process, Otis kills Rondo, who was also on the chain gang after having been arrested some time after the end of the previous film and been sent to the same prison, but did not recognize Otis. Meanwhile, Baby unsuccessfully seeks parole, as her mental state has further deteriorated since her incarceration.


Once free, Otis and Foxy begin planning to free Baby from prison. To accomplish this, they kidnap the family and friends of the prison's warden, Virgil Dallas Harper. Otis and Foxy demand that Harper help Baby sneak out of prison or they will murder everyone they hold hostage. Harper follows their commands and sneaks Baby out of prison by disguising her as a guard. However, once Baby is freed, Otis and Foxy decide to eliminate the loose ends and kill all the hostages, as well as Harper. Now united, the three are undecided as to what to do next but eventually decide to flee to Mexico, a decision that is made more pressing due to Baby's growing instability.


Otis, Baby, and Foxy manage to successfully cross the border and flee to a small town in Mexico that is celebrating the Day of the Dead and hole up in the town's lone hotel. They briefly worry about being recognized but dismiss these concerns, unaware that the hotel's owner has in fact recognized them and has alerted Rondo's son, Aquarius, to their location. The owner keeps them occupied with both the celebration and local prostitutes, while Aquarius heads out to the location with several henchmen in tow. The following morning, Baby bonds with a local worker, Sebastian, who notices Aquarius's arrival. He warns Baby of the danger before running to warn Otis, just as Aquarius's men break into the whorehouse. Otis and Sebastian hold off the attackers until Foxy arrives and rescues them both. Otis separates from them, managing to successfully find the hotel owner and kill him. During this time, Baby manages to kill several of Aquarius's men using a bow and arrow set she took from Harper's house. Eventually, Foxy and Baby are outmatched by Aquarius and taken prisoner. During this, Aquarius tells Sebastian he's not worth the bullet and leaves him for dead. Aquarius and his remaining goons use Baby and Foxy to draw Otis out into the open.


On review aggregator Rotten Tomatoes, the film holds an approval rating of 58% based on 38 reviews, with an average rating of 5.6/10. The website's critics consensus reads: "3 from Hell may be of interest to fans of the trilogy, but those not already on board with Rob Zombie's gory saga will find little to lure them in here."[25] On Metacritic, the film has a weighted average score of 50 out of 100, based on 5 critics, indicating "mixed or average reviews".[4]


Scout Tafoya of RogerEbert.com awarded the film four out of four stars, referring to it as Zombie's "most earnest and laid back nightmare yet."[26] Shawn Garrett of Rue Morgue, while conceding that there are "no surprises here," deemed the film "a fitfully entertaining exercise in 'more of the same' as grimy crime film".[27] Cody Hamman JoBlo.com awarded the film seven out of ten, writing: "While I do still wish the ending of The Devil's Rejects had been the end for these characters, I did find 3 from Hell to be a decent sequel."[28] During the premiere, Kevin Smith called the film "horror heaven."[29]


Luke Y. Thompson of Forbes said of the main actors "all three deserve better than re-quel hell."[30] Meagan Navarro of Consequence of Sound wrote, "Having been down these exact same roads before, the climax is bereft of any tension and stakes...by the time the end credits roll, you feel it."[31] A.A. Dowd of The A.V. Club found the film unnecessary, giving it a D+ and calling it "a slow death by nostalgia."[32] Similarly, John Squires of Bloody Disgusting awarded the film one-and-a-half skulls out of five, writing: "3 from Hell is proof that sometimes in horror, dead really is better."[33] Comics Beat reviewer Edward Douglas deemed the film "easily, the worst movie of the year."[34]


The film opens with several news reports covering the events of the prior film. Through the reports, it is revealed that Baby, Otis, and Captain Spaulding miraculously survived their shootout with the police and that they will be tried for their crimes. The trial is widely covered nationwide and becomes a cause célèbre, resulting in the organization of protests that insist the trio's innocence. Numerous fanatics also adopt the chant "Free the Three", claiming that their crimes were committed as a means to fight against the system. Despite this, all three are found guilty and sentenced to life in prison. In addition to the final verdict, Captain Spaulding is executed via lethal injection. Otis' half-brother, Winslow Foxworth "Foxy" Coltrane, shows up to help Otis escape from prison while he is outside doing work on a chain gang. In the process, Otis kills Rondo, who was also on the chain gang after having been arrested some time after the end of the previous film and been sent to the same prison, but did not recognize Otis. Meanwhile, Baby unsuccessfully seeks parole, as her mental state has further deteriorated since her incarceration.


by Walter Chaw 3 From Hell's twin fathers are Sam Peckinpah and Jim Thompson; when Baby (Sheri Moon Zombie) screams "Kill em, kill em all!" in obvious emulation of that iconic early moment in The Wild Bunch, she announces that the picture's setting in a disgusting Mexican villa is not just purposeful, but meaningful and pointed. In scope, the film is better framed as Rob Zombie's The Getaway, which, as may be expected, keeps the surreal, cannibalistic ending from the novel, unlike either of its proper adaptations. Indeed, 3 From Hell is as sordid, violent, base as anything from Peckinpah or Thompson; and an observant a satire of how the world runs on the threat of violence and the promise of sex. Likewise, it's steeped in self-loathing, that sense that everything is in an active state of putrefaction. If The Getaway can be read with profit as a film about the transactional nature of human relationships, Zombie's films are also best considered as detailed, acutely sensitive explorations of human, especially familial, relationships. 3 From Hell is his most pointed statement about the nigh insurmountable cost of existence. The marriage makes sense, as life is never cheap in Zombie's films. In fact, life and the living of it, is really fucking expensive, and no one gets out alive.


Consider the machinations behind Otis (Bill Moseley) and Baby's deliverance from bondage as the film opens: the one settling a barely-remembered score, the other the product of a hostage exchange engaged in absolute bad faith. Every relationship is curated with a price and a consequence. (In thematic intent, it's not unlike Hitchcock's pitch-black consumerist satire North by Northwest, in which the hero's mother is branded with a phone number, "Butterfield-8", shared with a notorious hooker.) The horror of the central "Firefly" family, stars of House of 1000 Corpses and The Devil's Rejects, is that they manipulate accepted rules of commerce for their own design. They are unbound. The horror of these films is our understanding of exactly how incorruptible they are, in a sense, and, by extension, how invulnerable they are to the very notions of Capitalism that enslave us. The entire idea of "fairness" is foreign to them. They're supernatural beings. A late scene where a duplicitous hotel manager (Richard Edson, extraordinary) offers to split his thirty pieces of silver with Otis "70/30" in exchange for his freedom ends, predictably, not well. Otis doesn't even look for the money after he's done. He's not unlike Norman Bates in that way, sinking Marion Crane's pilfered forty grand in the swamp with her corpse. The wonder of both movies is you spend time wishing they'd look for it. What sort of monster couldn't use a few grand? 041b061a72


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